Skip to content

FAQ

FAQ at hertfordshirecctv.comHere on our FAQ page, you'll find answers to some questions you may have prior to buying your CCTV system.

If your question isn't listed here or you'd like more information, please don't hesitate to contact us.

Within forty-eight hours of your purchase, one of our representatives will contact you to arrange a site visit and discuss the installation details for your new CCTV system.

During the visit, our representative will arrange a date for the installation. Most systems can be installed and be up 'n' running in a single day.

We listen to our customers and it's quite evident that the Hikvision series of CCTV systems and components are hugely popular.

Within forty-eight hours of your purchase, one of our representatives will contact you to arrange a site visit and discuss the installation details for your new CCTV system.

During the visit, our representative will arrange a date for the installation. Most systems can be installed and be up 'n' running in a single day.

Yes. All prices quoted in our store are inclusive of VAT and as a VAT registered company, we're legally obliged to provide a full VAT invoice with every purchase.

Security Solutions UK VAT number is 942 3413 42.

Indeed there are a lot of companies and tradesmen out there offering similar services but few can boast over thirteen years of experience installing alarms, CCTV and door access systems across the northern home counties and London. On top of that, the very ethos of the company is geared towards giving our customers a level of support and service that we would demand and expect for ourselves. Our aim is to establish long lasting relationships with our customers, offering peace of mind which begins with something quite simple; trust. We want you to be confident that we're always there for you.

Hey, don't take our word for it, check out some of our customers' testimonials at the bottom of our About Us page.

We are indeed Security Solutions UK. We have several websites covering the northern home counties and if you live in Hertfordshire, it just might be easier for you to remember hertfordshirecctv.com. It's as simple as that!

Fundamentally there are two infrastructures that can be employed to connect CCTV cameras to a network video recorder (NVR); Power-over-Coax (PoC) and Power-over-Ethernet (PoE).

In a traditional PoC system, the signals from the cameras are delivered to the NVR via RG58 coaxial cable (similar to that used for cable TV) and power to the cameras is also sent (in the other direction) from the NVR to the cameras. PoC systems have been around for a long time and offers a very cost-effective CCTV solution.

PoE systems use CAT5e network cable, the same cable used on modern computer networks. Again image data is sent from the cameras to the NVR via the CAT5e cables and the cameras are powered by a supply voltage that is delivered from the NVR and sent to the cameras via the same CAT5e cabling.

The term 'IP' stands for Internet protocol and refers to the data communication type used as well as the CAT5e infrastructure employed in such systems.

PoE systems are more expensive but it can be argued that they're a little more future-proof than PoC systems. Due to the use of network cable, PoE systems benefit from being able to run over greater distances. Hence, for larger installations, PoE is the only way to go. Having said that, subjectively, we still prefer the image quality of PoC systems.

The more ‘megapixels’ a camera displays, the more ‘image’ the camera displays. Higher megapixels doesn’t mean better image quality but does mean more image and inadvertently means better quality when you need to zoom in on to a portion of the image. More of this in a minute.

With ‘1080’ being the norm’ now-a-days, the resolution of the image is actually 1920 (pixels horizontal) by 1080 (pixels vertical). Multiplying 1920 by 1080 will give you the area in pixels of the image; a bit like calculating the area of a rectangle, the dimensions of which are in centimetres. So, 1920 x 1080 = 2,073,600 pixels which can be rounded off to 2,000,000 or 2 megapixels. Get it?

Okay, so why do you need the highest possible resolution?

If an incident occurs and you need to check your CCTV to for example, identify one or more individuals, then you need to bear in mind that a person’s face only occupies a small area of what is being filmed by any single camera. You may therefore, need to zoom in on a person’s face and it’s when zooming in, that resolution really matters. With higher recording resolution, the image can be ‘expanded’ with very little pixilation (distortion).

The maximum resolution of a camera isn’t the end-all-be-all. A camera’s lens, image sensor and the processing algorithms employed, all contribute towards image quality. In fact, some 2 megapixel cameras can outperform cameras of higher resolution because of the quality of the other factors just mentioned.

You’ll most likely be familiar with the suffixes ‘I’ and ‘p’ after the vertical resolution like 1080p, for example. The suffix ‘i’ stands for interlaced and the suffix ‘p’ stands for progressive scan. Without getting too technical, progressive scan mode may appear to be sharper, and fast-moving action can be easier to watch. Now-a-days, manufacturers tend to be supporting and hence developing progressive scan type displays and imaging devices.

4k is a relatively new standard that we’re all hearing about. A 4k imaging device has a resolution of 3840 (pixels horizontal) by 2160 (pixels vertical). Yes, we can hear you; so why isn’t 4k called 2k as 2160 is quite close to 2,000? A good question. The industry simply decided to change from referencing the vertical resolution, to referencing the horizontal resolution.

While 4k CCTV systems do exist, it’s quite impractical at the moment, to employ them in residential installations. If running over coax cable for example, the quality of the cable required, would make the cost of just the cable alone, way too expensive for most people. The same goes for the video recorder. A 4k network video recorder (NVR) would be required and again, the cost of doing so would make a 4k domestic system way too expensive for most of us.

Did you get that bit? Having a super-dupa high-resolution camera (or cameras) is one thing but you need a recorder that'll record several streams of that super-dupa high-resolution. Most people just won't to pay the price for something that tends to just sit there watching the front garden!

After all that, for the vast majority of domestic installations, good quality, 2 megapixel cameras and a system that can process 1080p is just fine.

 

Fundamentally there are two infrastructures that can be employed to connect CCTV cameras to a network video recorder (NVR); Power-over-Coax (PoC) and Power-over-Ethernet (PoE).

In a traditional PoC system, the signals from the cameras are delivered to the NVR via RG58 coaxial cable (similar to that used for cable TV) and power to the cameras is also sent (in the other direction) from the NVR to the cameras. PoC systems have been around for a long time and offers a very cost-effective CCTV solution.

PoE systems use CAT5e network cable, the same cable used on modern computer networks. Again image data is sent from the cameras to the NVR via the CAT5e cables and the cameras are powered by a supply voltage that is delivered from the NVR and sent to the cameras via the same CAT5e cabling.

Cameras that are designed to run on PoE systems are often referred to as IP cameras where 'IP' stands for Internet Protocol.

PoE systems are more expensive but it can be argued that they're a little more future-proof than PoC systems. Due to the use of network cable, PoE systems benefit from being able to run over greater distances. Hence, for larger installations, PoE is the only way to go. Having said that, subjectively, we still prefer the image quality of PoC systems.

We’re not going to lie and so the short answer is yes!

We all appreciate that technology is advancing at a ridiculously exponential rate and unlike alarm systems, the technology employed in video systems is being developed all the time. For example 4k CCTV systems just aren't affordable for most of us at the moment but it’s only a matter of time. The same goes for wireless high-resolution video transmission which is hugely expensive but again, the price will only come down in time.

We therefore recommend that you consider regularly replacing your CCTV system, much in the same way that you’d upgrade your television (sorry, I meant lounge display… see what I mean).

No. All our cameras are fitted with infrared LEDs which automatically come on when the ambient light level falls below a certain threshold. When that happens, the imaging system switches over to night mode. When in night mode, colour is lost but the black and white image is otherwise perfectly clear.

The operating system of your recorder is a version of Linux, a consumer-based version of the Unix operating system. As such, you should be able to use any compliant desktop. What we mean by ‘compliant’ is that no specific drivers are required. Having said that, if you attach a desktop that does require drivers for specific functions, then nine times out of ten, the basic functions of the keyboard and mouse should (should) work.

Now here’s the best bit; you can even attach a wireless desktop! Yes, that’s right. Not Bluetooth as that will definitely require drivers but a simple 2.4 GHz wireless system will indeed work just fine. Oh the freedom!!!

IMPORTANT: We can't guarantee let alone offer any warranty for and on any components you may add to your CCTV system, after we're commissioned it.

No, of course you don’t. Go to our shop, buy a 4-camera system and add an additional camera, or two or three. We’ll upgrade your 4-channel recorder to an 8-channel recorder and add your additional camera!

If you require four cameras on top of your 4-camera kit, we hope you'll consider just buying our 8-camera system!

Yes, we do. Please check out hertfordshirealarms.net for more details.

Load More